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For Your Health

fitnessGirl-ssKeeping a Training Journal

A training diary or journal is a personal record of events, experiences and observations.  It is one of the best tools you can use if your goals are to improve. Performance trends and patterns that cannot be seen by observing one day at a time become clear in a diary.

Top 4 reasons you should have a training journal

1. Confirm Patterns

It can be as easy as seeing that on Thursdays you are always more fatigued, so on that day you don’t box you do yoga instead.

2. Build Confidence

A training diary creates a permanent record of accomplishments. Reviewing every weekly goal and training period-objective achieved will back you up when your confidence is faltering.

3. Be Accountable

A training diary makes it tougher to skip training sessions when you know you have to log your actions for the day. Many athletes publish their training logs online to make them even more accountable.

4. Give Your Coach What They Need

If you have a coach, keeping a training diary that is accessible for your coach to read 24/7 is an essential part of effective communication. The more information you can gather and provide your coach, the better job they can do for you. Using an online training there are many that you can utilize!

Getting Fit Fast?

fit_fastInactive people can achieve major health & fitness gains in a fraction of the time.

Only 90 minutes a week versus the recommended 3-5 hours per week…

The following research is based specifically on cycling, though any intense exercise that is maxing physical output in short spurts will achieve similiar results when done safely..ie: boxing/kickboxing, swimming, running, rowing, ellipical machine…

You’ve probably heard it before, but if you need more proof to do interval training

Science News

Instead of long stints in the gym and miles of running in the cold, the same results could be achieved in less than a third of the time, according to new research published February 1 in The Journal of Physiology.

The current recommendation of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UK Department of Health is that people of all ages should do three to five hours of endurance training per week to increase health and fitness and prevent chronic diseases and premature mortality. However, most people find it difficult to set aside this much time in their busy lives.

This study has taken existing research to a new level to prove that replacing endurance training with two types of interval training, High intensity Interval Training (HIT) and Sprint Interval Training (SIT), can make a massive difference to our health and aerobic fitness. In two articles in the 1 February issue ofThe Journal of Physiology, the researchers describe their recent discoveries that three sessions of SIT, taking just 90 min per week, are as effective as five sessions of traditional endurance exercise, taking five hours per week, in increasing whole body insulin sensitivity via two independent mechanisms.

LJMU researcher Matthew Cocks explains: ‘One mechanism involves improved delivery of insulin and glucose to the skeletal muscle and the other involves improved burning of the fat stored in skeletal muscle fibres. Additionally, we found a reduced stiffness of large arteries which is important in reducing the risk of vascular disease.’

On the basis of these novel and earlier findings from other laboratories, Professor Wagenmakers expects that HIT and SIT will turn out to be unique alternative exercise modes suitable to prevent blood vessel disease, hypertension, diabetes and most of the other ageing and obesity related chronic diseases.

LJMU researcher Sam Shepherd describes:

“SIT involves four to six repeated 30 second ‘all out’ sprints on special laboratory bikes interspersed with 4.5 minutes of very low intensity cycling. Due to the very high workload of the sprints, this method is more suitable for young and healthy individuals….

However….anyone of any age or level of fitness can follow one of the alternative HIT programmes which involve 15-60 second bursts of high intensity cycling interspersed with 2-4 minute intervals of low intensity cycling. HIT can be delivered on simple spinning bikes that are present in commercial gyms and are affordable for use at home or in the workplace.’

— Dr. Laura Stix

Breakfast Brains by Dr. Laura Stix

fruit-saladNew research has found that children who regularly have breakfast on a near-daily basis had significantly higher full scale, verbal, and performance IQ test scores.

In one of the first studies to examine IQ and breakfast consumption, researchers examined data from 1,269 children six years old in China, where breakfast is highly valued, and concluded that children who did not eat breakfast regularly had 5.58 points lower verbal, 2.50 points lower performance, and 4.6 points lower total IQ scores than children who often or always ate breakfast after adjusting for seven sociodemographic confounders.

“Childhood is a critical period in which dietary and lifestyle patterns are initiated, and these habits can have important immediate and long-term implications,” said lead author Jianghong-Liu, PhD, RN, FAAN, associate professor at Penn Nursing. “Breakfast habits appear to be no exception, and irregular breakfast eating has already been associated with a number of unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, frequent alcohol use, and infrequent exercise.”

At age 6, a child’s cognitive ability as both the verbal and performance levels is rapidly developing. Both the nutritional and social aspects of breakfast play a role. After a whole night of fasting, breakfast serves as a means to supply “fuel” to the brain. Meanwhile, social interaction at breakfast time with parents may promote brain development. Mealtime discussions may facilitate cognitive development by offering children the opportunity to expand their vocabulary, practice synthesizing and comprehending stories, and acquire general knowledge, noted the authors.   The researchers suggest that schools play a role in stressing the importance of eating breakfast by delaying start times and/or providing breakfast to allow students to profit from the cognitive benefits of eating before a morning curriculum.

“Because adequate nutrition in early childhood has been linked to increased IQ through childhood, which is related to decreased childhood behavioral disorders, better career satisfaction, and socioeconomic success in adults, breakfast consumption could ultimately benefit long-term physical and mental health outcomes as well a quality of life,” said Dr. Liu. “These findings may reflect nutritional as well as social benefits of breakfast consumption on children and hold important public health implications regarding regular breakfast consumption in early young children.

– Dr. Laura Stix

SF Health: Boxing by Syd

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